Tag Archive for: child safety

NDPA Joins National Water Safety Month

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

(OVERLAND PARK, KS) – As families converge on aquatic centers, pools, splash pads, waterparks, and open bodies of water for recreational water activities this Memorial Day weekend, it is vital to ensure safety is a priority for all people. The National Water Safety Month campaign supporters offer six important tips and reminders for parents and caregivers about safer water practices.

As you enjoy time in and around water this summer, keep these six water safety tips in mind:

  1. Capable & Constant Supervision – Actively supervise children and non-swimmers around the water, even when lifeguards are present. Don’t just drop kids off. Avoid distracting activities such as checking email or social media. Drowning is quick and silent.
  2. Water Competency – No matter your age, learning to swim and survive in the water is one of the best ways to be safer in and around the water.
  3. Prevent Unsupervised Access To Water –Barriers and alarms help prevent access to water during non-swim times. Almost 70% of toddler drownings occur during non-swim times. Four sided fencing with a self-closing self-latching gate helps prevent unplanned access.
  4. Swim With A Buddy – Do not allow anyone to swim alone. Even at a public pool or a lifeguarded beach, use the buddy system.
  5. Wear A Life Jacket – Adults and kids should always wear a properly-fitted U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket while boating. Non-swimmers and inexperienced swimmers should also always wear a life jacket when in and around the water. Inflatable toys can be fun but are not a substitute for U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets.
  6. Be Prepared For Emergencies – Learn how to prevent and respond to emergencies by learning CPR.

About National Water Safety Month

National Water Safety Month is a joint effort of the American Red Cross, the National Recreation and Park Association, Pool & Hot Tub Alliance and the World Waterpark Association. Joining the NWSM partnership in 2022 is the National Drowning Prevention Alliance, a non-profit organization dedicated to reducing the incidence of drowning and preventing tragedy around water.

These organizations honor National Water Safety Month in May, along with thousands of aquatics facilities and professionals, through educational programs, public service announcements, governmental proclamations, dealer and aquatics business promotions and the distribution of water-safety-themed materials, aimed primarily at the public and designed to help prevent drowning and water-related illness and injuries. 

Detailed information and free resources in support of National Water Safety Month, for both consumers and businesses, can be found at www.nationalwatersafetymonth.org. Connect with National Water Safety Month on Facebook (@watersafetymonth).

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Aleatha Ezra
Director of Park Member Development
World Waterpark Association
aezra@waterparks.org

Cort Jones
Communications Manager
National Recreation and Park Association
cjones@nrpa.org

Don Lauritzen
Communications Officer
American Red Cross
media@redcross.org  

Laura Metro
Marketing & Communication Director
National Drowning Prevention Alliance
Laura.metro@ndpa.org

Jessica Howard
Vice President, Marketing
Pool & Hot Tub Alliance
jhoward@phta.org

Bathing is a part of our daily routine. It’s not uncommon for us to forget to take proper precautions while we or our children are in the bathroom. This is also considered one of the most dangerous rooms in our home. January is National Bath Safety Month which makes it the perfect time to do what is needed to minimize the risk of injury and drowning in the bath. 

An estimated 87 children die each year from drownings at home. Two-thirds of these incidents took place in the bath. Remember a drowning can occur in as little as two inches of water. These incidents can be prevented if you implement layers of protection at home.

The American Academy of Pediatrics offers the following tips to help prevent incidents in the bath:

Supervision:

Children can drown in only a few inches of water, so never leave a young child alone in the bath, even for a moment. If you can’t ignore the doorbell or the phone, wrap your child in a towel and take him along when you go to answer them. Bath seats and rings are meant to be bathing aids and will not prevent drowning if the child is left unattended. Never leave water in the bathtub when it is not in use. It’s also important to have anything and everything you think you’ll need within arm’s reach before​ getting down to business.  

Slips and falls

Install no-slip strips on the bottom of the bathtub. Put a cushioned cover over the water faucet so your child won’t be hurt if he bumps his head against it. Get in the habit of closing the lid of the toilet, and get a toilet lid lock. A curious toddler who tries to play in the water can lose his balance and fall in.

Water temperature

To prevent scalding, adjust your water heater so the hottest temperature at the faucet is no more than 120 degrees Fahrenheit (48.9 degrees Celsius). Test the water with your wrist or elbow to check that it feels warm, not hot. When your child is old enough to turn the faucets, teach him to start the cold water before the hot.

Medicine and toiletry storage

Keep all medicines in containers with safety caps. Remember, however, that these caps are child-resistant, not childproof, so store all medicines and cosmetics high and out of reach in a locked cabinet. Don’t keep toothpaste, soaps, shampoos, and other frequently used items in the same cabinet. Instead, store them in a hard-to-reach cabinet equipped with a safety latch or locks.

Electric appliances

If you use electrical appliances in the bathroom, particularly hair dryers and razors, be sure to unplug them and store them in a cabinet with a safety lock when they aren’t in use. It is better to use them in another room where there is no water. An electrician can install special bathroom wall sockets (ground-fault circuit interrupters) that can lessen the likelihood of electrical injury when an appliance falls into the sink or bathwater.

Swimming toys

Prevent Blindness America has declared December as Safe Toys and Gifts Awareness Month

The group encourages everyone to consider if the toys they wish to give suits the age and individual skills and abilities of the individual child who will receive it, especially for infants and children under age three.

This holiday season (and beyond), please consider the following guidelines for choosing safe toys for all ages:

  • Inspect all toys before purchasing. Avoid those that shoot or include parts that fly off. The toy should have no sharp edges or points and should be sturdy enough to withstand impact without breaking, being crushed, or being pulled apart easily.
  • When purchasing toys for children with special needs try to: Choose toys that may appeal to different senses such as sound, movement, and texture; consider interactive toys to allow the child to play with others; and think about the size of the toy and the position a child would need to be in to play with it.
  • Be diligent about inspecting toys your child has received. Check them for age, skill level, and developmental appropriateness before allowing them to be played with.
  • Look for labels that assure you the toys have passed a safety inspection – “ATSM” means the toy has met the American Society for Testing and Materials standards.
  • Gifts of sports equipment should always be accompanied by protective gear (give a helmet with the skateboard)
  • Keep kids safe from lead in toys by: Educating yourself about lead exposure from toys, symptoms of lead poisoning, and what kinds of toys have been recalled; being aware that old toys may be more likely to contain lead in the paint; having your children wash their hands frequently and calling your doctor if you suspect your child has been exposed to lead. Consult the last two websites listed below for more information.
  • Do NOT give toys with small parts (including magnets and “button” batteries which can cause serious injury or death if ingested) to young children as they tend to put things in their mouths, increasing the risk of choking. If the piece can fit inside a toilet paper roll, it is not appropriate for kids under age three.
  • Do NOT give toys with ropes and cords or heating elements.
  • Do NOT give crayons and markers unless they are labeled “nontoxic”.

For more information:

Call Prevent Blindness America at 800-331-2020 or visit www.preventblindness.org/safe-toy-checklist

www.kidshealth.org/parent/firstaid_safe/home/safe_toys.html

www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002473.htm

www.child-familyservices.org/december-is-national-safe-toys-and-gifts-month/

Originally posted by the American Public Health Association here.

Safe Gates Help Save Lives

HUNTINGTON BEACH, CA:  Drowning is the leading cause of unintentional death in children aged 1 – 4 years and the majority of the children that drown in swimming pools most commonly gain access to the pool area when there is no fence or through a faulty fence or gate.  

Combined with constant child supervision and other layers of protection, a possible solution to this issue is physically checking your pool gate and maintaining your pool gate regularly to ensure it self-closes and self-latches at all times. You should not be able to open a gate at all without activating the release mechanism which should be out of the reach of toddlers. 

D&D Technologies®, the inventor and manufacturer of the MagnaLatch® Pool Safety Gate Latch and the world leader in high-performance gate hardware, has partnered with the National Drowning Prevention Alliance (NDPA) to establish a Check Your Pool Gate Month campaign kicking-off Memorial Day Weekend and continuing through the month of June.  The initiative was created to remind pool owners of the vital need to ensure pool fences, gates, latches and hinges are secure and in top working order.  Every pool owner should be confident they have a safe swimming zone.  

“Our aim with Check Your Pool Gate Month is to educate pool owners about pool safety and to encourage them to check their pool surroundings not once a year, but regularly,” says Jim Paterson, D&D’s VP of Sales and Marketing.

A few minutes is all it takes for pool owners to check that their pool fences and gates, including latches and hinges, are in good working order.  If you can’t fix it call your local contractor to service your gate and ensure the gate is secured while waiting. This simple routine done regularly could help save the life of a child.  

Safety checklist for pool gates

  • Should open outwards, away from the pool
  • Height of latch release mechanism is least 54” from the bottom of the gate (check local codes)
  • Must be self-closing and self-latching
  • Hinges should be rust-free and bind-free
  • Hinges should be reliable and tension-adjustable for closing speed
  • Latch must be adjustable horizontally and vertically to accommodate gate movement
  • Gate will latch when latch is in the locked or unlocked position
  • Latch cannot be disengaged using implements (e.g. garden or pool tools)
  • Latch cannot be shaken or jolted open
  • Gate will shut and latch securely from any open angle or force
  • Complies with all applicable standards, codes and legislation for pool safety

For more information on pool safety and compliance visit:  www.us.ddtech.com/pages/pool-safety-compliance and www.ndpa.org

It’s critical to check your local pool codes for compliance, as local codes may vary. 

D&D Technologies gate hardware can be purchased on Amazon or at Home Depot or Lowes.

About D&D Technologies 

D&D Technologies is the recognized leader in safety and high-performance gate hardware, providing the broadest range of gate hardware for every application.  D&D Technologies produces over 300 gate hardware products and has 30 years of experience in the gate hardware industry.  Products include MagnaLatch® magnetic pool and safety gate latches, TruClose® adjustable, self-closing safety gate hinges, LokkLatch® gate latches, SureClose® and Shut It industrial hinges.  D&D’s diversity of products continually set new standards in design, performance, craftsmanship and innovation–tied together by a top level of quality and service.  D&D products are rust free and consistently exceed all relevant safety barrier codes around the world for the residential, commercial and industrial markets.

Hello, NDPA Conference Attendees & Supporters, 

Thank you for your patience and understanding during this difficult and unprecedented time. As you know, the 2020 National Water Safety Conference is scheduled for April 6-9 in Fort Worth, TX. Given government regulations, employer travel restrictions, published public health recommendations, and participant safety, it is impossible to host our in-person conference in Fort Worth. Instead, we are excited to announce that we will be moving the 2020 National Water Safety Conference to a new and interactive virtual format to be held over the same dates. 



The NDPA Board of Directors has had extensive discussions over the past week due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we felt a responsibility to host our conference as it is the kick-off to the drowning prevention season and although unquantifiable, we know, saves lives.  We also felt it was our duty to our alliance members, supporters, and the nation as we fear drowning rates will dramatically increase as children and families will have extended time at home and potential exposure to water more than ever. Therefore, we mobilized quickly, reviewed our options and determined the best course of action.  

We as the NDPA, recognize the serious role our annual conference plays to support professionals, advocates, educators, parents, and all drowning prevention warriors in preparing for the upcoming season and have become equally excited to deliver the most value in a flexible and innovative way. 

We have expanded our conference team in the past few days to include experts and experienced individuals who will help us ensure we can successfully deliver you the best value possible. Yes, our upcoming conference will be different, just as many things are in our lives right now. While it is not possible for us to deliver the same in-person experience, we have come up with something as valuable that will allow many more people to “join” our conference than ever before. Our commitment to you is to work harder than ever to provide each of you with a meaningful and well executed event that provides exceptional educational opportunities.  

We will be providing more information about online participation and support in the coming days to attendees, speakers, and sponsors.
 ·      ATTENDEES: We will be communicating with you on a regular basis to inform you of our conference schedule and ways to make the most of your online participation.
·      SPEAKERS: We will be communicating with you in the next 48 hours to provide you with information about the delivery of your presentation. Please keep an eye out for further information via email.
·      EXHIBITORS/SPONSORS: We will be communicating with you by the end of this week regarding your options for virtual participation and adjusted benefits. 

Again, thank you for your continued patience during this time. We will have further information available for all participants in the coming days. We know that this is an extremely unusual and unprecedented time in the world. The NDPA will be working constantly to ensure we can provide the drowning prevention and water safety community with the most important education and connectivity possible. Thank you for helping us save lives! 

Best regards, 
Adam 

Adam B. Katchmarchi, Ph.D., EMT-B
Executive Director
National Drowning Prevention Alliance (NDPA)

Home pools and spas are, of course, drowning hazards which is why implementing layers of protection is so important.

Bearing in mind that drowning can happen in even a very little amount of water, think of all the other objects in your home that are full or potentially full of water: toilet bowls, unemptied tubs, sinks, bird baths, pet dishes… Babies and toddlers are naturally curious so having all these hazards in mind becomes increasingly important.

The following tips are meant to make your home safer:

Active Adult Supervision at All Times

  1. Your child must never be unattended when around water. Bear in mind that babies can drown in as little as one inch of water.
  2. When watching kids when they are in or around water, avoid any and all distractions. Keep young children within arm’s reach of an adult (touch supervision).

Empty Tubs and Buckets After Use

  1. Immediately drain the tub once bath time is over.
  2. Empty buckets, containers and kiddie pools as soon as they are no longer in use and store them upside down. This is so they don’t collect water.

Keep Lids and Doors Closed

  1. Close toilet lids and consider using toilet seat locks to prevent drowning.
  2. Keep doors to bathrooms and laundry rooms closed at all times.

Backyard Pools

  1. Watch kids when they are in or around water, without being distracted. Keep young children within arm’s reach of an adult. Make sure older children swim with a partner every time.
  2. When children are swimming and there are several adults present, make sure kids are actively supervised at all times by choosing a Water Watcher. A Water Watcher is a responsible adult who agrees to watch the kids in the water without distractions and wear a Water Watcher card. After a certain amount of time (such as 15-minutes), the Water Watcher card is passed to another adult, who is responsible for the active supervision. Download a Water Watcher card here.
  3. Install fences around home pools. A pool fence should surround all sides of the pool and be at least four feet tall with self-closing and self-latching gates.
  4. Teach children how to swim. Every child is different, so enroll children in swim lessons when they are ready. Consider their age, development and how often they are around water.
  5. Make sure kids learn how to swim and develop these five water survival skills:
  • step or jump into water over their heads and return to the surface;
  • float or tread water for one minute; 
  • turn around in a full circle and find an exit
  • swim 25 yards to exit the water; and
  • exit the water. If in a pool, be able to exit without using the ladder.

Learn CPR

  1. Know what to do in an emergency. Learning CPR and basic water rescue skills may help you save a child’s life.

Source: Safe Kids Worldwide

NDPA 2019 Achievements

Every day, an average of ten people die from unintentional drowning. Drowning continues to rank fifth among the leading causes of unintentional injury death in the United States and second for causes of death in children aged 14 and under. 

The NDPA continues to work hard to bring those numbers down through water safety awareness, education and advocacy. As 2019 draws to a close, we look back and take stock of the progress made to further our goals of drowning prevention:

These achievements would not have been possible without the support and contributions of all our members, partners and sponsors and above all the commitment and dedication of the NDPA Board Members. 

We are ready to welcome a new year and a new decade with redoubled efforts to prevent drowning and promote water safety best practices throughout the country.

United, we can prevent the tragedy of drowning. Support the NDPA today!